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RETAIL

SHORT-TERM COURSES

Individuals seeking career or personal growth as well as employers investing in the advancement of their workforce.

Class Course Description (Class) Last Class Date Actual Start Date/Time Hours Per Meeting Sunday? Monday? Tuesday? Wednesday? Thursday? Friday? Saturday? In District Cost Out of District Cost Training On Demand Content URL Session Format
Falls from even as little as four feet can cause serious injury or death to workers. OSHA defines two kinds of fall protection: passive fall protection, such as guardrails or netting, and active fall protection. When passive fall protection is not enough, active fall protection such as personal fall arrest systems, positioning systems, travel restraint systems and rope descent systems can help protect workers. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify active fall protection systems and their characteristics. This course is designed for personnel who may need to use an active fall protection system in the course of their work duties. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Active shooter incidents have become a growing source of concern in recent years. By their nature these situations are unpredictable and chaotic, making it difficult for employers to prepare. Even though the odds of an active shooter event occurring in the workplace are low, fears about these situations can lower employee morale and create anxiety and uncertainty for your staff. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommend active shooter training for all employees to help counter these fears, and to reinforce a "whole community" approach to preventing and responding to workplace violence. Training helps employees feel prepared and empowered to respond quickly if an active shooter situation occurs on the job. This course is designed to help learners in any industry recognize recommended actions to take during an active shooter event, as well as common secondary concerns such as providing first aid for common injuries and communicating with emergency responders. This course focuses on the Run, Hide, Fight program for reacting to an active shooter situation. While Run, Hide, Fight is a good set of guidelines for active, healthy adults, it may not be suitable for all people in all situations. SafetySkills assumes no liability for any injuries or damage that could occur while attempting these techniques. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Aerial lifts are typically used to provide workers with access to a workspace that is temporarily inaccessible, usually due to height restraints. They are used in maintenance and construction work, but also by emergency rescue personnel. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify the types of aerial lifts, their uses, and identify the hazards and safe work practices associated with aerial lifts. This course is intended for workers in general industry or construction who may need to work with or around aerial lifts and can help employers comply with OSHA regulations on aerial lifts. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral with excellent heat- and fire-resistant properties. Throughout the 20th century, asbestos was commonly used in building materials, pipe coatings, flooring, paint and texturing, and many other applications. Unfortunately, inhaling asbestos fibers can cause asbestosis, a chronic – and often fatal – lung disease. Fortunately, U.S. manufacturing began phasing out asbestos in the 1970s. However, there are still many buildings, homes and commercial facilities that contain Asbestos-Containing Building Materials (ACBMs). This course will give workers an overview of asbestos safety, including how asbestos exposure can happen, the negative health effects of asbestos exposure, and common safety practices they must follow to avoid exposure. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimates that back injuries make up nearly twenty percent of all workplace injuries and costs the nation an estimated twenty to fifty billion dollars a year. Learners who complete this online training course will demonstrate knowledge of the major causes of workplace back injuries and how to prevent them. Employees will learn about hazards and the three major types of hazard controls. This course is intended for general industry employees who, during their regular work duties, are required to lift and carry materials. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recognizes that many employees come in contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials during daily duties and thus are potentially exposed to this occupational hazard. OSHA’s bloodborne pathogen standard has served as the basis for implementing policies and practices to minimize workers’ risk of exposure to BBP's, specifically to the Hepatitis B virus (HBV), the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This online training course will teach employees about the hazards of bloodborne pathogens in the workplace and the basic controls required under OSHA’s bloodborne pathogen standard. Employees will learn how to identify major bloodborne diseases and symptoms, how pathogens are transmitted and the basics of exposure prevention and incident response and cleanup. This awareness-level course is designed for all workers who may be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) at any time during the performance of their regular job duties. This course is presented in English, Spanish, German, Portuguese and Mandarin.
When the body’s temperature drops below 98.6°F, the blood vessels constrict to keep the warm blood near the body’s core and vital organs to protect them. In doing this, the blood flow to the arms and legs decrease and those parts of the body become vulnerable to frostbite or hypothermia. This course will teach employees about the hazards of working in cold temperatures and how to minimize or eliminate those hazards. Employees will learn how to anticipate and identify the effects of cold stress and methods used to prevent it. This course is specifically designed for employees in upstream and midstream oil and gas operations who, as part of their regular work duties, will be subject to cold weather conditions for significant periods of time.
People who work outdoors or in cold indoor environments such as walk-in freezers are frequently subject to cold, wet working conditions. Working in wet or cold environments can take a heavy toll on workers’ bodies and be hazardous to their health. Workers who work in wet in cold or wet environments must be able to prepare to work in these conditions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify factors that contribute to cold stress, recognize signs and symptoms of cold stress, and identify controls that can help prevent cold stress. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees the hazards and safety precautions associated with confined spaces, with a heavy emphasis on OSHA safety requirements. Employees will learn how to identify confined spaces, their hazards, methods used to control those hazards and the regulations regarding `permit-required' confined spaces. This course is intended for general industry employees who are required to work in or around areas defined by OSHA as confined spaces. This course is designed to help employers meet OSHA’s standards on permit-required confined spaces. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Work in the oil and gas industry takes a lot of manpower, so oil and gas companies often hire contractors to perform specialized work tasks. These host companies rely on the contractors to work safely and abide by their own company policies, as well as federal, state, and local laws. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify general safety programs on oil and gas sites, recognize hazard controls to protect personnel, and identify general and specific hazards on oil and gas sites. They should also be able to identify permit-required work tasks, identify environmental and emergency response considerations and recognize company and site-specific contractor policies. This course is designed for workers in the oil and gas industry.
Coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19, is a recently discovered respiratory disease. While this virus is new and many people are concerned about its spread, taking the same general precautions used to prevent flu and other virus transmission is the best strategy for staying healthy. After learners have completed this course, they should be able to identify general preventive measures for virus transmission, as well as strategies specific to COVID-19. SafetySkills Video Length (9:00)
Electricity is one of the modern era’s greatest discoveries, but it also presents some dangers. It can cause serious injury or death if it leaves wiring or equipment and flows into the human body. Employees that successfully complete this course will display the ability to recognize the safety function of electrical grounding, its applications in the workplace, and OSHA’s grounding requirements for workplace electrical equipment. This online learning course is designed for all workers who may use handheld power tools or other electrically powered equipment while at work. This course will assist employers in meeting OSHA’s standards on wiring and grounding equipment. This course is available in English and Spanish
Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to recognize the dangers of electricity, possible electrical injuries, and how to use standard hazard controls. This course is aimed at oil and gas employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair, and can assist the employer in meeting OSHA’s electrical safety requirements for unqualified workers.
Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to identify the general OSHA electrical safety standards, safe work practices when working on or around electrical equipment, OSHA requirements for qualified and authorized electrical equipment workers, and safe work practices qualified and authorized workers should use when working on or near exposed electrical equipment. This course is aimed at employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair, and can assist the employer in meeting OSHA’s electrical safety requirements for qualified workers.
Working in and around excavations or trenches can be hazardous. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports an average of 24 worker deaths and 88 injuries every year from cave-ins alone. Falls, falling loads, hazardous atmospheres and mobile excavating equipment can also create hazards for workers in trenches and excavations. Workers in excavations need to know what hazards they'll be exposed to and how to protect themselves. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify trenching and excavation requirements and recognize hazards in excavations. Learners should also be able to identify hazard controls in and around excavations and recognize both employee and competent person responsibilities in excavations.
Falling is consistently one of the most common causes of workplace fatalities. Falls from as little as 4 to 6 feet can cause serious injuries, sometimes death. There are many different types of work and many different types of fall hazards. This online learning course will teach employees the importance and practice of consistent fall protection. Employees will learn about fall hazards, how to identify fall protection methods and various safe work practices. This course is presented in English, Spanish, German, Portuguese and Mandarin.
Fires can happen anytime, anywhere, without warning. The National Fire Protection Association, or NFPA, reports that there are more than 1.3 million reported fires in the United States every year. If you encounter a fire at home or on the job, a portable fire extinguisher can help you to protect yourself and possibly stop the fire in its tracks. This online learning course will introduce employees to portable fire extinguishers, how they work and when to use them.
Most workplaces have procedures and controls to prevent fires, but fire safety needs special attention on an oil and gas site. Fires are one of the most common emergencies to contend with on oil and gas sites, and can be one of the most harmful if not dealt with properly. This course should give employees the knowledge to safely react and respond to a fire emergency in their workplace. Employees will learn to recognize common fire hazards found on oil and gas sites, identify safeguards for fire prevention and protection, and identify procedures for emergency response and evacuations. This course is intended for oil and gas industry employees who are required to understand their responsibilities in a fire emergency. This course assists employers in meeting fire safety standards required by OSHA.
Fires and explosions account for 16% of the total fatalities in the oil and gas industry. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify flash fires, the engineering and administrative controls used to prevent flash fires, the difference between flame resistant and flame retardant clothing, and the fire hazards associated with the three stages of oil and gas operations. This course is designed for all employees who may work for an oil and gas company that performs well drilling, servicing, and production-related operations. This course is intended to assist the employer in meeting OSHA regulations on personal protective equipment.
Many facilities use a wide variety of chemicals, and many of those chemicals have potential hazards. Flammable and combustible liquids primarily pose fire and explosion hazards, and safe handling and storage are important to minimizing these hazards. Wherever flammable and combustible liquids are used, proper handling, storage and fire control requirements must be followed. This course will teach employees about the hazards of different flammable and combustible liquids and how to minimize or eliminate those hazards. Employees will learn how to identify flammable and combustible liquid hazards with safety data sheets and labeling, and how to employ hazard prevention measures. This course is intended for employees who, during the course of their regular job duties, may use or come in contact with flammable and combustible liquids. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Forklifts and other powered industrial trucks are very useful tools in many different industries. They are so common that many people think they’re easy to drive, and don’t require much training to operate. However, forklift injuries are common, including collisions, pinches, roll-overs, and accidents involving loads. This course is intended for workers who are required to operate a forklift or other powered industrial truck on the job. Learners that complete this course will display the ability to recognize the forklift's instruments and controls, common hazards associated with forklift operation and OSHA-required safe work practices for forklift operation. This course is designed to assist forklift operators and their employers to complete the formal training (classroom) portion of OSHA’s required training for operators of powered industrial trucks. This course is available in English, Spanish, German, Portuguese and Mandarin.
In 2012, OSHA updated the Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) standard to require the use of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). Employees who need HAZCOM training under the OSHA standard must now also be trained over the requirements of GHS. This course is intended for employees who have already received HAZCOM training, but who still need to be trained over the recent GHS update. This course alone will not fulfill the HAZCOM training requirement. Employees who have not yet received HAZCOM training should take one of our Hazard Communication courses, all of which include all of the information covered in this module. This course is presented in both English and Spanish.
H2S Clear is a certification through PEC that meets or exceeds the ANSI Z390.1 2017 standard that many large oilfield companies are using as a minimum requirement to work on sites with H2S.
Tools are such a common part of our lives that it’s difficult to remember that they may pose potential hazards to our safety. This course will teach employees the importance of hand and power tool safety and how to achieve it. Employees who successfully complete this course should learn the common hazards of different types of hand and power tools, including electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic and abrasive-wheel tools and how to minimize or eliminate those hazards. This course is intended for oil and gas employees who, as part of their regular work duties, are required to use or work around hand and power tools. This course can assist employers with meeting regulations outlined in OSHA’s regulations on hand and power tools.
Chemicals can pose a wide range of health and physical hazards, and exposure to hazardous chemicals is common for workers in a large variety of industries. When workers are exposed to hazardous chemicals, OSHA requires employers to provide employees with information about those hazards and training over how to protect themselves and others from harm. During this course, employees will learn about OSHA's Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) standard and the methods for learning about chemical hazards, including labels, safety data sheets (SDSs) and hazard assessments. This online learning course is designed for employees who need initial or refresher Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) training. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Chemicals can pose a wide range of health and physical hazards, and exposure to hazardous chemicals is common for workers in a large variety of industries. When workers are exposed to hazardous chemicals, OSHA requires employers to provide employees with information about those hazards and training over how to protect themselves and others from harm. During this course, employees will learn about OSHA's Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) standard and using safety data sheets (SDSs) to determine chemical hazards in their workplace. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HZC-1.2 Hazard Communication.
A safety data sheet, or SDS, provides employees with information about hazardous chemicals. SDSs must follow a standard format, and will always present certain information that workers and emergency responders need. This course is intended to help employees understand what information is presented in the SDS and where to find it. After successfully completing the course, learners should be able to identify the key components of a safety data sheet, including the 16 sections required by the Globally Harmonized System (GHS), an international system of rules for classifying and labeling chemicals. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MSD-1.2 Safety Data Sheets.
Workers and emergency responders who cleanup hazardous waste have a higher rate of exposure to these materials than the average person. OSHA's HAZWOPER Standard helps protect employees involved with hazardous waste cleanup, disposal, and emergency response. This bundled course includes the entire series of online learning modules designed to meet the annual 8-hour refresher requirements for HAZWOPER general site workers: Introduction to HAZWOPER, Hazard Recognition, Toxicology and Medical Surveillance, Site Entry and Reconnaissance, Personal Protective Equipment, Respirators, Decontamination, and Exposure Monitoring.
The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, or NIOSH, estimates that 76% of all oil and gas extraction workers are exposed to hazardous levels of noise. NIOSH also estimates that 25% of noise-exposed workers have trouble understanding speech, and an additional 11% of workers experience tinnitus. Hearing loss usually happens slowly, over time, so it’s important for workers to consistently protect their hearing on the job. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize how sound and noise impact hearing, identify hearing protection controls on oil and gas sites, and identify safe practices for hearing conservation and audiometric testing.
Working in high heat can cause a number of health issues, particularly for workers who are not acclimated to the conditions. This course will teach employees the hazards of working in high heat and how to minimize or eliminate those hazards. Employees will learn how to identify the hazardous health effects of high heat, methods to prevent those health effects and what to do if a co-worker exhibits symptoms of heat stress such as heat fatigue, heat rash, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Tailored for the oil and gas industry with appropriate examples and imagery, this course is intended for workers in the oil and gas industry who are required to work in high heat conditions for extended periods of time.
Working in high heat can cause a number of health issues, particularly for workers who are not acclimated to the conditions. This course will teach employees the hazards of working in high heat and how to minimize or eliminate those hazards. Employees will learn how to identify the hazardous health effects of high heat, methods to prevent those health effects and what to do if a co-worker exhibits symptoms of heat stress such as heat fatigue, heat rash, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. This course is intended for employees who, during the course of regular work duties, are exposed to high-temperature conditions for significant periods of time. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Hexavalent chromium is a toxic form of chromium used in pigments, metal coating, wood preservatives, fungicides, and several other products and manufacturing processes. When used correctly, chromium is a versatile element, but hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen and inhalation hazard. Employees who take this course will display the ability to recognize the basic properties of hexavalent chromium, its hazards, and OSHA's recommended and required exposure limits/safe work practices. This course is designed for employees working in jobs where hexavalent chromium exposure is a potential hazard, and can assist employers in meeting OSHA’s hazardous materials, PPE, environmental, welding and toxic substances standards.
Hot work is any work that produces fire or sparks, including welding, flame cutting, soldering, and brazing. Welding and other forms of hot work can pose a serious health hazard to workers, but training, safe practices and hazard controls can help workers keep themselves safe. This course should help employees identify types of hot work and their hazards, and identify employee roles and responsibilities for hot work. Employees will also receive information about hazards specific to hot work, additional hazards associated with hot work, and hazard controls for performing hot work. This course is provided to assist the employer in meeting the requirements of OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.252, General Requirements and 254, Arc Welding and Cutting. This course is intended for employees who perform hot work, including welding, brazing and torch cutting, as part of their regular work duties. In addition to this course, the employer might also provide courses on Compressed Gas Safety, Fire Safety and Portable Fire Extinguishers. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be a site-specific training component required that must be fulfilled by an employer. This course is available in English and Spanish.
Arc welding is an important, but dangerous task. Workers can easily burn their eyes and body, breathe in toxic fumes or damage their hearing. This course should help employees identify hazards associated with arc welding and hot work on oil and gas production sites, and how to protect themselves. Employees will also receive information about burns, fumes and gases, electric shock, fire and noise hazards. This course is provided to assist the employer in meeting the requirements of OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.252, General Requirements and 254, Arc Welding and Cutting. This course is intended for oil and gas employees who perform hot work, including welding, brazing and torch cutting, as part of their regular work duties. In addition to this course, the employer might also provide courses on Compressed Gas Safety, Fire Safety and Portable Fire Extinguishers. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be a site-specific training component required that must be fulfilled by an employer.
Class Description SafetySkills: Influenza is a common disease that can cause an uncommon amount of trouble for business owners and managers. It’s important to have a plan for pandemic flu because in a worst-case-scenario situation, businesses could experience a loss in profits, a temporary loss of viability or even bankruptcy. Learners who successfully complete this course will have displayed the ability to identify the major points of a pandemic flu preparedness plan and recommended employee-related and business-related policies and procedures to include in such a plan. This course is designed for human resources officers or other upper managers working for small- to medium-sized businesses. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Ladders are one of the most common and simple tools people use on the job. It’s easy to forget that they can also be extremely dangerous. Each year in the United States, accidents involving ladders cause approximately 300 deaths and 130,000 injuries requiring emergency medical attention. This course should assist learners in recognizing hazards of ladder use, different types of ladders, and inspection requirements. This course is intended for employees in the oil and gas industry who use ladders at work on a regular basis, and will assist employers in meeting OSHA standards on ladder safety. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be a site-specific training component required that must be fulfilled by an employer.
Lead has been used for thousands of years for different reasons such as cooking pots, utensils, and plumbing. However, accidental exposure and consumption to lead is poisonous and can result in significant organ and tissue damage. This course will teach employees about the hazards of lead exposure and controls used to minimize or eliminate those hazards. Employees will learn about the effects of lead exposure and the use of personal protective equipment and other methods to reduce the risk of hazardous exposure. This course is intended for general-industry employees who may be exposed to significant levels of lead, and can assist employers in meeting OSHA’s requirements on lead exposure. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Lockout/tagout is a system that helps ensure workers stay safe while servicing or repairing equipment by making it physically impossible for that equipment to run or move. This course will teach employees how lockout/tagout programs work and the different roles workers must play to make them successful. Employees will learn to identify the importance of proper lockout/tagout procedures, what workers are authorized to perform those procedures, lock and tag systems used for lockout/tagout, and the special provisions of lockout/tagout programs. This online learning course is intended for employees who, during their regular work duties, are required to perform lockout/tagout procedures, and for employees who work on equipment that is subject to regular maintenance or repair requiring lockout/tagout. This course is presented in English, Spanish, German, Portuguese and Mandarin.
Lockout/tagout is a system that helps ensure workers stay safe while servicing or repairing equipment by making it physically impossible for that equipment to run or move. This course will teach employees how lockout/tagout programs work and the different roles workers must play to make them successful. Employees will learn to identify the importance of proper lockout/tagout procedures, what workers are authorized to perform those procedures, lock and tag systems used for lockout/tagout, and the special provisions of lockout/tagout programs. This course is designed for all oil and gas industry workers who will participate in or be affected by lockout/tagout procedures.
During equipment or machinery maintenance, there is a danger of workers being injured by stored energy, or by someone reactivating the machine or equipment. These kinds of accidents can cause severe injury or even death. Lockout/tagout is a method to ensure all workers stay safe by preventing accidental start-up or the release of stored energy. When learners have successfully completed this course, they should be able to recognize the importance of proper lockout/tagout procedures and the roles involved, and also identify lockout/tagout related equipment.
Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Employees who successfully complete this course will learn to define machine guarding, locate fundamental machine areas, machine hazards, the types of machine guards, and the types of machine devices. This course is intended for oil and gas industry employees who, during their regular work duties, are required to work with or around machines equipped with guarded machinery, and can assist employers in meeting the provisions of OSHA’s Machinery and Machine Guarding standard.
Working in a medical care facility may be rewarding, but it can also involve certain risks. For example, caring for people infected with communicable diseases puts healthcare workers at greater risk of catching these diseases. This course is designed to give healthcare workers the skills to protect themselves from airborne diseases by using an N95 respirator. Learners who successfully complete this course will display the ability to recognize the purposes and proper use of N95 respirators in a healthcare setting. This course is designed for healthcare workers who may be exposed to various airborne illnesses at work, and can assist employers in meeting OSHA’s requirements on respiratory protection.
When people think of radiation, they may think of large-scale disasters, environmental catastrophes, or superheroes in comic books and movies. However, most of us are exposed to low levels of natural and man-made radiation every day. On an oil and gas site, workers can be exposed to higher levels of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). NORM can build up in pipelines and on equipment, and high concentrations can pose a significant health hazard when they aren’t properly managed. NORM can be enhanced by human activity such as oil and gas extraction. This type of NORM is known as technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM), and can increase workers’ potential for exposure. Fortunately, most workers are in little danger when they take the right precautions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize characteristics and effects of radiation and NORM, recognize NORM sources and handling procedures, and identify worker protections from NORM on oil and gas sites.
Personal protective equipment, or PPE, has been around throughout history in various forms. Even everyday clothing is a form of PPE, but many jobs and workplaces have unique hazards that require additional protection, such as gloves, boots, eye protection and many others. This course will teach employees to identify the need for PPE, define the concept of a hazard assessment, things to consider when choosing PPE, and the different types of PPE used to protect all parts of the body. This online learning course is intended for general-industry employees who, during their regular work duties, are required to use personal protective equipment. This course is presented in English, Spanish, German, Portuguese and Mandarin.
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s General Duty Clause requires employers to provide a workplace environment that is free from hazards that are likely to cause serious injury or death. This includes providing the training and personal protective equipment to protect employees from hazards on oil and gas sites. Workers who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize common hazards on oil and gas sites and identify the required and recommended personal protective equipment necessary to mitigate those hazards. This course is meant for all employees working on oil and gas exploration and extraction sites.
Fires can inspire panic, and reviewing how to use a fire extinguisher beforehand can save precious seconds that could make all the difference in an emergency. Employees who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of how and when to use different types of portable fire extinguishers. Employees will learn to recognize when to use a portable fire extinguisher, the various types of fire extinguishers, and the steps of the PASS technique. This course is designed for employees in the oil and gas industry who may use a fire extinguisher, and should assist the employer in meeting OSHA’s standard on portable fire extinguishers.
Fires can happen anytime, anywhere, without warning. The National Fire Protection Association, or NFPA, reports that there are more than 1.3 million reported fires in the United States every year. If you encounter a fire at home or on the job, a portable fire extinguisher can help you to protect yourself and possibly stop the fire in its tracks. This course will introduce employees to portable fire extinguishers, how they work and when to use them.
If you encounter a fire at home or on the job, a portable fire extinguisher can help you to protect yourself and possibly stop the fire in its tracks. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize the uses of a portable fire extinguisher and the five classes of fire. This microlearning course is part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see FRS-2.2 Portable Fire Extinguishers.
Many work environments can involve airborne particles that could be hazardous if inhaled. Airborne viruses, hazardous chemical fumes, and even some types of dust particles can cause injury or illness if workers breathe them in. If the atmosphere becomes hazardous to breathe, employees may require respiratory protection. Learners who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of the basics of respiratory protection and how to use it on the job. Employees will learn about potential inhalation hazards, the different respirator types and their uses, how to fit test a respirator mask, and respirator care and maintenance. This course is designed for general industry employees who, during their regular work duties, are required to wear respiratory protection, and is intended to assist the employer in meeting OSHA’s Respiratory Protection Standard. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be additional site-specific training components, hands-on training, and health testing required that must be fulfilled by an employer. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Oil and gas exploration and production often causes workers to encounter hazardous atmospheres. Hazardous chemical fumes, low oxygen environments, and even some types of dust particles can cause injury or illness to workers. If the atmosphere becomes hazardous to breathe, employees may require respiratory protection. Learners who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of the basics of respiratory protection and how to use it on the job. Employees will learn about potential inhalation hazards, the different respirator types and their uses, how to fit test a respirator mask, and respirator care and maintenance. This course is designed for employees on oil and gas exploration and production sites who, during their regular work duties, are required to wear respiratory protection, and is intended to assist the employer in meeting OSHA’s Respiratory Protection Standard. The course features examples and scenarios unique to the oil and gas industry. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be additional site-specific training components, hands-on training, and health testing required that must be fulfilled by an employer.
Rigging is a complex operation that requires extensive planning to keep everyone safe. An unstable load, a misinterpreted hand signal, lack of experience, lack of maintenance, and infrequent inspections can all cause incidents. Only trained and qualified individuals should ever attempt to perform rigging operations. This course alone won’t qualify learners to perform rigging, but it provides an overview of rigging operations and their hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize employee roles in rigging operations, identify tools and equipment used in rigging, and identify types and components of rigging inspections. They should also be able to identify procedures for rigging and lifting loads, and recognize hazards associated with rigging and lifting.
Rigging in the foundation of many hoisting and lifting operations in the oil and gas industry, but it does come with some significant hazards, such as tipovers, contact with electric lines and falling loads. Workers who successfully complete this course will be able to identify the requirements of a qualified rigger and operator and the qualifications of each. The learner will also learn about the different types of cranes and other hoisting equipment and their functions, how to conduct inspections, how to rig, lift, and land a load, and occupational hazards in rigging operations and how to avoid them. This courses references OSHA regulations on rigging and lifting objects.
Scaffolding is a very versatile and useful tool for construction or repair of buildings. It can be assembled and disassembled easily and can be built very tall or wide, depending on the building’s shape. But as with any tool, using scaffolding requires care and knowledge. This course will teach employees the basics of staying safe while working on scaffolds. Employees will learn the definition of a scaffold, the potential hazards of working on a scaffold like falls, electrocution and scaffold collapse and major hazard control methods. This course is intended for employees who are required to perform work on scaffolds. This course can help employers comply with OSHA’s safety requirements for scaffolding.
Scissor lifts are popular in many job settings because they provide a mobile elevated work surface that is flexible, quick to set up, and relatively safe and easy to use. However, they do still come with hazards, and injuries on scissor lifts can be severe. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize common scissor lift hazards and safe operating procedures. This course is intended for workers in any industry who use scissor lifts on the job.
Phase I includes interpreting security guard law, first aid, fire extinguishers and writing field notes and reports. You will also interpret legal powers. Phase II includes public relations, fixed post duties, patrolling and investigating security incidents. Cost of the class includes first attempt for the certification exam.
Use either a revolver or a semiautomatic pistol, but not both, in a single class. To complete the training with both types of handguns, you need to enroll twice. Instruction fulfills the CLEET Armed License Training requirement for the type of weapon used. Price includes first attempt at written certification test.
Silica is a very common ingredient found in all kinds of products. In recent years, the rising number of silica-related illnesses has caused the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to pay closer attention to silica exposure in the workplace. Workers who successfully complete this course will be able to identify common materials containing crystalline silica, and the hazards associated with crystalline silica exposure. They will also demonstrate knowledge of the health effects associated with crystalline silica exposure, and measures that can be taken to eliminate or minimize crystalline silica exposure on the job. This course is designed for workers in the oil and gas, construction and general industries who may, in the course of performing their duties, come in contact with materials that may contain breathable crystalline silica particles.
Oil and gas exploration and production sites carry a risk of causing harm to public health or the environment in the form of spills and other releases. While oil and gas companies will have very specific protocol for dealing with emergency releases, field personnel are often responsible for responding to smaller, incidental releases. Learners who successfully complete this course will demonstrate the ability to identify the difference between incidental and emergency releases, identify recommended release-prevention measures, and identify proper incident-release response measures. This course is intended for oil and gas employees that may come across a spill while working on the job, and can help employers comply with the Oil Pollution Act and EPA regulations on spill prevention and control.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are roughly 150,000 construction site workers injured each year. Many of these accidents are preventable. If a worker recognizes a situation in which there is the potential for themselves or a coworker being injured, or if there is a potential of a release of a contaminant to the environment, that worker has a responsibility to stop the work that is being done until the potential danger has been removed and the issue resolved. Upon completion of this course, the learner will demonstrate the ability to identify the elements of a stop work authority program and employee responsibilities in a stop work authority program. This course is presented in English and Spanish.
Sexual assault and sexual misconduct are an ongoing and serious problem at schools across the country. According to the National Institute of Justice, about 1 in 5 women and 6% of men are victims of completed or attempted sexual assault while in college. There are more than 3,000 reports of forcible sex offences reported on college campuses every year. The U.S. Department of Education and its Office for Civil Rights regard these crimes as a serious violation Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, commonly referred to as “Title IX,” which was designed to prevent sexual discrimination in education. Since 1972 a number of additional, related laws have been passed with the goal of preventing and addressing sexual misconduct on school campuses, including most recently the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act. Failure to comply with these laws is also considered a violation of Title IX. These laws and regulations are important for protecting students, but they have created new and sometimes confusing obligations for schools and their employees. This course will help employees understand Title IX and its companion laws regarding sexual misconduct in education, and their role in helping to prevent and respond to sexual misconduct. This course is designed for all employees at educational institutions that fall under the provisions of Title IX, with particular focus on those designated Responsible Employees. It is intended to assist the employer in fulfilling the training requirements for Responsible Employees imposed under Title IX and the Cleary Act.
Even though most of us spend less than 1% of our driving time in reverse, the National Safety Council estimates that one in four vehicle accidents occur while backing, and that most backing accidents are caused by drivers using poor backing techniques. Backing can be particularly hazardous for drivers on the job, especially when backing large vehicles or vehicles with trailers. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify general backing hazards and safe practices when backing. If learners’ job duties include driving large vehicles, such as semi-trucks or construction vehicles, they should also be able to identify general backing hazards and safe practices for larger vehicles.
Oil and gas field work often takes place in remote locations, and there is a good chance that workers may come into contact with wildlife on the job. Wild animals can attack people, transmit diseases and damage property, so it is important for workers to know what to do when they encounter wild animals in the field. This course is designed to teach oil and gas workers how to identify various types of dangerous and nuisance animals common to North America, the hazards they present, and the standard precautions to take if these animals are encountered. This course is intended for all employees who may encounter wild animals in the course of their duties. This course is available in both English and Spanish.
Jobs in the oil and gas industry often require driving and working outdoors. In some cases, this means working or driving in extreme temperatures or conditions. Workers who successfully complete this course will be able to identify the factors that contribute to heat loss, the adverse effects of cold stress and how to treat them, preventative measures to avoid cold stress, the winter-related hazardous road conditions and safe driving practices, and how to prepare for hazardous driving conditions. This course is intended for oil and gas workers who are required to work or drive in hazardous winter-weather conditions.
Many employees work by themselves for at least part of their shifts, including delivery drivers, janitorial and housekeeping workers, home health workers, and many night shift employees. Working alone comes with its own safety and security hazards, and those hazards vary widely from job to job. It’s important for lone workers to know all of their responsibilities and what to do during an emergency so they can safely perform their job duties without supervision. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize who lone workers are and the hazards they may face. Learners should also be able to identify requirements and best practices for working alone.

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From first jobs to lifelong careers, retail launches more people into employment than any other. From the part-time sales associate at a local store on Main Street to an app-developer for a major retailer, the retail industry directly employs 29 million Americans, making it the largest private sector-employer in the economy. (According to the National Retail Federation.)  At Autry Technology Center, we’ve worked with more than 500 local businesses in our district and are focused on supporting our local industries. A strong retail industry improves our quality-of-life and economic vitality.

 

Here’s what we know when it comes to retail:

  1. The retail sector experiences the second-highest turnover rate of any industry, as high as 81% in 2018.
  2. Regular training that is effective, engaging and specific can significantly lower retail turnover rates.
  3. Lower turnover means more sales, higher margins, improved client experiences and lower recruiting costs – a.k.a. more money for your business!

 

Here’s how you and Autry Technology Center can define and enhance what makes you exceptional for the success of your company. The driving force of Oklahoma CareerTech system is to develop and grow a top quality workforce and set our future generations up for success. We look forward to partnering with your business!


SAMPLE COURSE OPTIONS

RETAIL SAFETY

TRAINING AND REGULATIONS

  • Back Injury Prevention
  • Customer Violence in the Retail Environment
  • Fire Safety in Retail
  • Ladder Safety
  • Retail Ergonomics
  • Slips/Trips/Falls in Retail Sales
  • Understanding OSHA

CLIENT

EXPERIENCE

  • Company Brand and Culture
  • Customer Service & Sales
  • Pop Up Retail
  • Selling Online for Small Business
  • Social Media Marketing
  • The Science of Shopping
  • Understanding Web Analytics

EMPLOYEE AND

MANAGER DEVELOPMENT

  • Business of Retail: Operations and Profit
  • Communication Skills
  • HR for the Non-HR Manager
  • Reading Body Language as a Sales Tool
  • Retail Industry Fundamentals 
  • Strategic Planning
  • Supervisor Academy
  • Team Building

CHOOSE YOUR DELIVERY METHOD

autry

AUTRY TECH

Multiple training facilities
available to accommodate
any size of group.

onsite

ON SITE

We bring the training to you!
Our trainers will come to you and turn your space into the classroom.

online

ONLINE

Several of our training courses are available 100 percent online – access the training from a computer, cell phone or other device 24/7. 

blended

BLENDED

Personalized training options to fit the needs of your employees!